STORM WATCH: Arctic blast to bring snow and plunging temperatures to Alberta


STORM WATCH: Arctic blast to bring snow and plunging temperatures to Alberta


Saturday, November 8, 2014, 9:09 AM – If you live in Alberta, you might be waking up to snow showers and rain, and it’s only going to get worse.

Snowfall warnings are widespread across the province, ahead of a blast of freezing air that will put an end to above-seasonal temperatures and dump up to 30 cm of snow on the province.

“Without question, the coldest Arctic air of the season will dive south from northern Canada,” Weather Network meteorologist Tyler Campbell says. “Consequently, there will be ample cold air to work with for this system, with a hard freeze forecasted for Sunday evening in southern Alberta.”

On Saturday morning, light snow showers were already occurring, along with some light rain and mixing south of Edmonton, moving through the Red Deer area through the morning.

But heavy snow will move in Saturday evening, sinking southeast through Sunday.

“The heaviest snow will be west of Edmonton, with up to 30 cm of snow possible,” Weather Network meteorologist Matt Grinter said early Saturday. “Edmonton should see less than 10 cm, and Calgary could get 10-15 cm by the end of the weekend.”

Neither city is included in the snowfall warnings at this time, but a special weather statement issued by Environment Canada says Calgary and areas to the southeast have a risk of freezing rain in the early morning hours Sunday.

Then the real freeze begins. Very cold air will begin to funnel down into Alberta Sunday, driving temperatures down into the negative single digits, along with winds making it feel even colder.

Skies will clear overnight Monday, but the temperatures will be even colder, and staying that way through the next week.


STORM WATCH: Margeaux Morin will have updates on this storm Saturday. See below for her video preview.



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